Review on Luminescent Metal-based Anion sensors on Coordination Chemistry Reviews

Congratulations to Anna and Dermot on the publication of their new review “Luminescent/colorimetric probes and (chemo-) sensors for detecting anions based on transition and lanthanide ion receptor/binding complexes” focusing on the recent highlights of metal complexes as luminescent probes for anions in Coordination Chemistry Reviews. Their review (87 references) describes key advances from the last five years in the use and mechanisms of main block, d– and f– metals in the design of luminescent probes for anion guests of both environmental and biological relevance.

Anna and Dermot are both PhD students and spearhead the TG groups own anion recognition research interests, studying the anion-directed self-assembly of interlocked systems such as [n]catenanes and rotaxanes while also providing support to others in the group to study anion interactions of their own systems.  Their research is kindly supported by the School of Chemistry (A.A.) and the Irish Research Council (D.G.) which supports our other IRC and SFI funded projects. Well done to all involved.

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Fergus is presented with the 2017 IUPAC-Solvay International Award for Young Chemists

 

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Many congratulations to Dr Fergus Poynton, who was presented with the IUPAC-Solvay International Award for Young Chemists by the president of IUPAC, Natalia Tarasova at the opening ceremony of the 46th World Chemistry Congress  last week. The acclaimed award is given each year to the best PhD theses in the chemical sciences worldwide, and Fergus received it alongside the remainder of the winners from both 2016 and 2017.

The week-long conference was held in São Paulo, Brazil, and included other such highlights as lectures by Nobel laureates Ada Yonath, Fraser Stoddart and Robert Huber, along with a series of symposia on Environmental Chemistry, ‘Big Data’, and Women in Chemistry.

Fergus received the 2016 Royal Irish Academy Young Chemists Prize in June for his doctoral thesis “Spectroscopic Investigations into the Excited-State Processes and Reactivity of Ruthenium(II) Polypyridyl Complexes”.

Alkermes visit the TG Group

The TG group had the pleasure of hosting a delegation from the biopharmaceutical company Alkermes earlier today. A fast-paced morning of talks were held in TBSI, where postgraduate students and postdoctoral researchers alike presented their work to the company. This was followed by a lunch and poster session at which much fruitful discussion took place. The group included Tarek Zeidan, Principal Scientist at the company, who works in collaboration with second year group member Isabel Hegarty.

Sam Bradberry successfully defends his PhD thesis

IMAG3236Congratulations to Sam Bradberry, who today successfully defended his PhD thesis, entitled Design and development of novel self-assembled luminescent lanthanide complexes in solution and in responsive soft materials.

The four year research project was carried out in collaboration with Dr Amir Khan of the School of Biochemistry and Immunology, TCD and Prof. Colin McCoy of Queens University Belfast. Sam’s work has been published in several journals including Chemical Communications and Faraday Discussions. After the viva, Sam joined the rest of the TG group for a celebratory reception in the Trinity Biomedical Sciences Institute.

 

Bruno flies to Southampton

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Bruno with Rob Laverick and Jon Kitchen

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Work at the Langmuir-Blodgett trough

Second year PhD student Bruno D’Agostino visited the University of Southampton last week as part of a collaboration with Dr Jon Kitchen on lanthanide-based Langmuir-Blodgett films. He also attended the day-long 2017 Southampton Supramolecular Symposium on Friday, which was organised by the Kitchen and Goldup groups in Southampton.

Oxana presents at ISMSC 2017 in Cambridge

Dr Oxana Kotova attended the 12th International Symposium on Macrocyclic and Supramolecular Chemistry in conjunction with ISACS: Challenges in Organic Materials & Supramolecular Chemistry, which was held this year in Cambridge Corn Exchange & Guildhall. There she presented a poster entitled “Discrete white-light-emitting Ln-based heterometallic assemblies in solution”. This work was recently published in Chemical Science. The conference included talks from various internationally renowned researchers including Nobel Laureate Prof. Fraser Stoddart, Prof. François Diederich, Prof. Harry Anderson, Prof. David Leigh and Prof. Vivian W.W. Yam amongst many other excellent chemists. Thanks to the organising committee for the excellent meeting.

Eoin McCarney attends the 67th Lindau Nobel Laureates Meeting

Fourth year PhD student Eoin McCarney is just back from an exciting week at the 67th Lindau Nobel Laureates Meeting, which was dedicated this year to chemistry. The annual conference brings together a diverse mix of undergraduates, PhD students, post-doctoral fellows, lecturers and of course, Nobel laureates – all to the island of Lindau just off the eastern shores of Lake Constance.

Highlights of the meeting included informal discussion sessions at which Eoin had the opportunity to ask Professors Ben Feringa and Jean-Pierre Sauvage about their views on science, education and policy. The two laureates won the 2016 Nobel Prize in Chemistry “for the design and synthesis of molecular machines.”

Eoin’s attendance at the Lindau meeting was sponsored by the Irish Research Council, who presented him with an award last month in recognition of his achievements.