New paper accepted in Dalton Transactions!

Many congratulations to Trinity College Dublin team Dr. Oxana Kotova, Dr. Steve Comby, Dr. Komala Pandurangan (now at Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research (JNCASR)), Dr. Floriana Stomeo (now at IPSEN Pharma), Dr. John E. O’Brien and Dr. Martin Feeney who in collaboration with Dr. Robert D. Peacock from University of Glasgow and Prof. Colin P. McCoy from Queen’s University Belfast who have had their paper entitled “The effect of the linker size in C2-symmetrical chiral ligands on the self-assembly formation of luminescent triple-stranded di-metallic Eu(III) helicates in solution” accepted in Dalton Transactions.

The article discussed the formation of chiral, luminescent [Eu2:L3] assemblies with high stability constants in solution. However, it was found that the composition of the assemblies in the solid state was more complex. The chirality of the studied systems allowed us to investigate their formation using various techniques including circular dichroism and circularly polarised luminescence spectroscopies and help their development towards materials for the applications in electronics for virtual reality applications (3D screens) and in medical diagnostic.

Graphical Abstract

The article is available online at:  https://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2018/dt/c8dt02753f#!divAbstract

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A new paper on monitoring the onset of bacterial infection using lanthanide luminescent probes within hydrogels accepted for publication in JACS

ln-luminscent_hydrogels_bradberry

The europium-based luminescence is only quenched when urease enzymes break down urea in the solution

Many congratulations to Esther, Sam and Sandra who had their paper “Luminescent Lanthanide Cyclen-Based Enzymatic Assay Capable of Diagnosing the Onset of Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections Both in Solution and within Polymeric Hydrogels” accepted in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. The work focuses on using delayed 
luminescence Eu(III)-based pH-responsive probes to monitor the activity of urease, which hydrolyses urea in
 aqueous solution upon onset of bacterial infection.
 This system can be incorporated into soft polymeric materials such as hydrogels. The work was carried out in collaboration with Prof. Clive Williams of the School of Biochemistry and Immunology in TCD and Prof. Colin McCoy from the School of Pharmacy, Queen’s University of Belfast.