New paper accepted in Chemical Science on a novel lanthanide-based white-light emitting system

Kotova-Comby-Lincheneau

Varying the colour of the emission by altering the molar fraction of europium in the system (𝛘Eu)

Congratulations to Oxana Kotova, Steve Comby and Christophe Lincheneau on their paper entitled “White-light emission from discrete heterometallic lanthanide-directed self-assembled complexes in solution” which has been accepted into the RSC journal Chemical Science. In this work, the newly designed multidentate ligand tdt was used, which provides three individual tridentate binding sites for lanthanide (Ln) ions. White-light emission was successfully achieved by carefully tuning (i) the molar ratio of Eu(III) and Tb(III) within the assembly and thus the relative intensity of the red and green emission, (ii) the excitation wavelength, as the tdt ligand consists of two different chromophores, and (iii) the ligand concentration, which greatly affects the intensity of the blue emission within the overall self-assembled complexes. We envisage that this system can be further developed and find its application as white-light emitting material or as a ratiometric sensor.

Top 25: Article among most downloaded Chemical Science papers

cd-titrations-top25An article from the TG Group entitled “The application of chiroptical spectroscopy (circular dichroism) in quantifying binding events in lanthanide directed synthesis of chiral luminescent self-assembly structures” was among the top 25 most downloaded Chemical Science articles from the last quarter of 2014. The article discusses the use of CD and other spectroscopic techniques to probe lanthanide-directed self-assembly behaviour in solution of chiral luminescent systems – a new approach to understanding the behaviour of these systems.

Dr Oxana Kotova, Dr Salvador Blasco, Dr Jon Kitchen and Dr Miguel Martínez-Calvo from the Gunnlaugsson Group worked in collaboration with Dr John O’Brien and Dr Brendan Twamley from Trinity College Dublin and Dr Robert Peacock in Glasgow on this exciting research.